Author Archives: Naturally Alise

Teaser Tuesday: Group Post

As part of a weekly feature, The Page Turners are here to share a piece of what we’re currently reading. Anyone can participate! Just do the following:

  • Grab your current read
  • Open to a random page
  • Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
  • BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
  • Share the title, page number & author, too, so that other readers can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

“The streetcar had cut him just below the torso and it had cut his left leg completely off and had crushed the right leg, because the streetcar…had just run right over him. He ended up bleeding to death.” Malcolm’s most vivid memory of his father’s funeral was his mother’s hysteria, and later her difficulty in coping with what had happened.

Malcolm X: A Life of Reinvention, page 31, by Manning Marable  –Alex

Subconsciousness could drive a person crazy if they suppressed themselves long enough.  Selah had already done this to herself before and come back; she didn’t want to scar anyone else.

Selah’s Bed,  page 10, by Jonoyne Adams –Alise

 

 

 

How dare I. Mrs. Reed? How dare I?  Because it is the truth.  You think I have no feelings, and that I can do without one bit of love or kindness; but I cannot live so : and you have no pity.  I shall remember how you thrust me back — roughly and violently thrust me back — into the red-room, and locked me up there, to my dying day; though I was in agony; though I cried out, while suffocating with distress, ‘Have mercy! Have mercy, aunt Reed!’

Jane Eyre, by Charlotte Bronte –Miss  Spinks

What genres of books do you enjoy the most?

Every Wednesday we are going to give you readers a chance to tell us about different aspects of books and reading in your life. One or more of the Page Turners will answer the question and then we would like to hear from you!

I most enjoy books written about women of the African Diaspora set pre-1960’s.  Probably 70% of the fiction that I read is of that genre.  Also I am a huge mystery/crime story buff.  I would call them my guilty pleasre but that would require guilt, lol.

 

What genres of books go you enjoy the most?

Who is your favorite book character?

Every Wednesday we are going to give you readers a chance to tell us about different aspects of books and reading in your life. One or more of the Page Turners will answer the question and then we would like to hear from you!


My absolute favorite book character Dominick Birdsey the protagonist from I Know This Much is True, by Wally Lamb.  I mostly loved this character because he was written so complex, yet believable.  His reactions to extreme  adversity and the writing of his relationship with his schizophrenic twin brother is some of the most brilliant character development and storytelling I have encountered in my reading history.

Who is your favorite book character?

Wednesday Lit Roundup

Who is your favorite author?

Every Wednesday we are going to give you readers a chance to tell us about different aspects of books and reading in your life.   One or more of the Page Turners will answer the question and then we would like to hear from you!

Gloria Naylor

 

My favorite author of all time is Gloria Naylor.  She is most famously known for The Women of Brewster Place which was also a very popular TV-Movie.  I have read all of her books multiple times.  Some of my favorites include Mama Day (which I reviewed here), Bailey’s Cafe, and Linden Hills. I love her intricate story telling, depth of character development, and realistic dialogue and subject matter.  I feel she is one of the most important and dynamic 20th century American writers.

 

Who is your favorite author, and why?

Wednesday Lit Roundup

Aside

One of my favorite books I read in 2010 is Lawrence Hill’s Someone Knows My Name. The story focuses on Aminata Diallo, who was born in West Africa in 1745. In 1802, Aminata goes to London to help the cause of … Continue reading

What is the worst book you’ve ever read?

Every Wednesday we are going to give you readers a chance to tell us about different aspects of books and reading in your life.   One or more of the Page Turners will answer the question and then we would like to hear from you!

 

I actually have a long list of disappointing books.  However, one of the worst boks I remember reading is actually a very popular one.

Yes,  “How Stella Got Her Groove Back”, I despise this book.  When I was a teenager I was a part of the whole Terry McMillan craze.  I remember reading “Mama” and “Waiting to Exhale” and loving them.  However, this book just didn’t cut it.  I remember being frustrated by Stella pining over and over  the fact of  the age difference between her and her new lover.   Dang Stella, we got the point!   That book and even the movie were supremely lame to me and very boring.  Also we see how Terry McMillan’s real life “Groove” worked out.  Nuff said.  What is the worst book you have ever read?  Share, we won’t bite.

What is your favorite book from childhood?

Every Wednesday we are going to give you readers a chance to tell us about different aspects of books and reading in your life.   One or more of the Page Turners will answer the question and then we would like to hear from you!

YAY Grover!

My favorite book growing up was “The Monster at the End of This Book,” by Jon Stone.   I had a huge bookcase when I was growing up, I have always been a big book nerd. I think the books I read as a child were probably the most applicable to adult life. Really, when it comes to life, the rules/guidelines are pretty simplistic. We just make things harder than they need to be. Here is a brief description of the book from Wikipedia

In this book, Grover is horrified to learn that there is a monster at the end of the book, and begs the reader not to finish the book, so as to avoid the monster.

Fearful of reaching the end of the book, Grover constructs a series of obstacles, such as attempting to tie pages together and laying brick walls, to prevent the reader from advancing.

Increasingly frightened (and also in awe of the reader’s strength at overcoming the obstacles), Grover pleads with the reader to stop reading as the book nears its conclusion.

However, the monster turns out to be Grover himself

This book made a profound statement, that what we are scared of in life is 9 times (plus 1) out of 10 within ourselves, or made up in our own mind.   I am realizing the monster at the end of the book, was just lil’ ol’ me (and Grover).

 

What is your favorite book from childhood?  Don’t be scared, we don’t bite!

Teaser Tuesdays: Group Post

As part of a new weekly feature, The Page Turners are here to share a piece of what we’re currently reading. Anyone can participate! Just do the following:

  • Grab your current read
  • Open to a random page
  • Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
  • BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
  • Share the title, page number & author, too, so that other readers can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

“If you took away all of the pieces that made up George Orson – his lighthouse Motel childhood and his Ivy League education, his funny anecdotes and subtly iconic teaching style and the tender, attentive concern he’d had for Lucy as a student – if all of that was an invention, what was left?  There was, presumably, someone inside the George Orson disguise, a personality, a pair of eyes peering out; a soul, she supposed you might call it, though she still didn’t know the soul’s real name.”

[no page number, reading via Kindle], Await Your Reply
By Dan Chaon
Shydel

This, like so many other things, was not a joking matter for Julius, who preferred to instigate and to control his comedies.  More than his friends, Julius was interested in power; It wasn’t a focused preoccpation: there wasn’t a type of power that he sought, just the absolute, brute fact it.

pg. 28, The Emperor’s Children
by Calire Messud

 

“We were the kind of girls who would always be very pretty if but if never seemed to happen. If Jasmine’s skin cleared up and she could keep her hair done and she did something about her teeth, which were a little crooked, and if I lost five pounds and got contact lenses and did something about the way my skin was always ashy, maybe we’d be the prettiest girls in Mount Vernon, but we weren’t, we were just us”.

pg. 10, “Virgins”, Before You Suffocate Your Own Fool Self
by Danielle Evans
 
“I even bragged to my friends how good I felt about the whole matter. When they were at my apartment during times when there wasn’t any food to eat, I told them that even though I starved, my time was my own and I could do anything I wanted with it.”
pg. 81 , “Revolutionary Suicide”
by Huey Newton
Alex


 

 

“As the smoke entered her lungs, she seemed to return to who she really was, who she was now. A forty-eight-year-old who was a receptionist for a plastic surgeon and rented DVDs and videos and looked for herself in the backgrounds of old movies.”

-pg. 5, “Third Girl From The Left” by Martha Southgate
Malca

 
 
 
 
 
What are you reading???